On the pulse 26th September 2012

  • Cancerkin needs you!
  • Maggie’s Getting Started with Cancer Treatment Workshop
  • The Royal Free Hospital holds its first ever web chat to mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month
  • Study into the causes of male breast cancer has found a gene that can increase the risk of the disease by up to 50%

Cancerkin needs you!

We are currently looking for volunteers to help at two events, both in support of breast cancer awareness month.

Our theatre event, ‘The Judas Kiss’ is being held on the 10th October 2012 and we are currently looking for volunteers to act as ushers, from 6.00pm until 10.30pm.

Our annual breast awareness stand will be on Tuesday 16th October 2012, from 10am to 4pm, outside the Atrium at the Royal Free Hospital. We will be handing out information on breast awareness and Cancerkin’s services and we need volunteers to hold collection tins and help manage the stall. 

Please get in touch if you are able to help us with either of these events, by contacting Holly either on 0207 830 2323 or by emailing h.lovering@cancerkin.org.uk. We look forward to your support!

 

Maggie’s Getting Started with Cancer Treatment Workshop

We are very pleased to be working with Maggie’s to provide a wonderful workshop on Tuesday 2nd October, from 12.30pm to 4.30pm. This workshop is for those who are recently diagnosed with cancer and aims to help them understand their treatment courses and to manage and feel empowered about their own lives during treatment. Everyone who participates is also given a specially made handbook which accompanies the workshop. Lunch is provided.

If you are newly diagnosed and would like to come to this session, please let Carissa know by calling 020 7830 2323 or e-mailing c.chu@cancerkin.org.uk as soon as possible as places are limited.

 

The Royal Free Hospital holds its first ever web chat to mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Consultant oncological surgeon Mo Keshtgar will take part in the Royal Free Hospital’s first ever web chat on Monday 8 October from 2-3pm to mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Open to all, it offers you the chance to ask a world-renowned breast cancer expert any question you may have.

To take part, simply visit the Royal Free website at 2pm on the 8th October and ask your question.

If you are unable to take part at that time, you can still ask your question by emailing rfh.communications@nhs.net (please put ‘web chat’ in the subject line) or by tweeting @RoyalFreeNHS before the event. They’ll answer as many questions as they can in the hour and you’ll be able to see the answers on their website after the chat has taken place. 

To find out more, please visit the Royal Free Hospital website here.

 

Study into the causes of male breast cancer has found a gene that can increase the risk of the disease by up to 50%

A study published this week in Nature Genetics has found a gene that can increase the risk of developing  the disease by up to 50 per cent.

Around 350 men are diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK each year, making it rare compared with the 48,000 women who develop the disease. These results, the work of scientists from the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), were drawn from the Male Breast Cancer Study, the world’s largest study into the causes of male breast cancer. This particular project, named the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) involved 823 male breast cancer patients, and investigated 447, 000 genetic changes. The results were then confirmed in a further 438 patients.

They found that changes in the RAD51B gene, involved in the repair of damaged DNA, can raise a man’s breast cancer risk by as much as 50 per cent. However, the absolute risk of breast cancer in men with this faulty gene remains low. Changes in a different part of RAD51B have been shown to raise the risk of breast cancer in women.

Study author Dr Nick Orr said: “This study represents a leap forward in our understanding of male breast cancer. It shows that while there are similarities with female breast cancer, the causes of the disease can work differently in men. This raises the possibility of different ways to treat the disease specifically for men.”

Professor Anthony Swerdlow, co-leader of the Male Breast Cancer Study, said: “Male breast cancer is rare, which makes it difficult to study. Through drawing on many hundreds of patients from this country and abroad, we can now start to unravel its causes. We will be continuing this research to try to find more genes that raise the risk of male breast cancer, in order to better understand the causes of this disease in men, and in women.

For more information, see here and here.

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